How to Use HCG in Males with Low Testosterone #HCG #Testosterone

From DrDach.com

For many men with symptoms of low testosterone, HCG is a useful add-on for their program.  Thanks to Dr. John Crisler for sharing his HCG protocol which can be found here or here.

What is HCG ?

HCG stands for Human Chorionic Gonadotropin.  HCG is a bio-identical human hormone that is well known for decades in medical research and clinical medicine as a hormone secreted by the placenta in the pregnant female.  In fact, measuring HCG in the female is the basis for the pregnancy test.  If HCG goes up, that means a viable pregnancy.  If HCG drops, or goes down, that means miscarriage or an aborting fetus.

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Do Bioidentical Hormones Have Side Effects?

Many people are afraid of the therapeutic use of hormones, even when topic is bioidentical hormones. Bioidentical hormones are plant derived (usually from soy or yam) and they are prepared in compounding pharmacies. As such, they are considered pharmaceutical preparations. Most are only available by prescription.

Bioidentical hormones are also classified as drugs in the sense that they are chemical substances that are used in the treatment, cure, prevention, or diagnosis of disease or used to otherwise enhance physical or mental well-being.

This is where it may get confusing. Almost everybody wants to avoid using drugs unless absolutely necessary. One of the reasons is that many drugs have side effects. Some will create chronic dependency, and patients may experience withdrawal symptoms when attempts are made to stop the drug. Although some drugs may effect cure of an illness, many only suppress certain symptoms or physical signs without eliminating the underlying causes or supporting the body’s innate ability to heal.

How does this apply to bioidentical hormones? I believe there is a difference between bioidentical hormones and most other drugs because the former are biochemically exactly the same as the hormones that the human body makes. For that reason the molecules cannot be patented.

Most other pharmaceutical drugs are not normally found in or produced by the human body. Their biochemical structure is unique and patentable. Because they are foreign to the human body they will almost always have side effects to some degree. A possible explanation is that the body’s metabolic and enzymatic systems are not prepared to handle  these foreign molecules.

For example, even a well known over the counter drug such as acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) has side effects which include the development of stomach ulcers and allergic reactions.

I believe that the various chemicals and hormones that the human body makes do not have side effects and that the same is true for bioidentical hormones. The human body contains water and sodium chloride, and synthesizes estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, prostaglandins, and many other chemicals. Does water have side effects? Of course not! However, it is possible to experience SYMPTOMS of an excess or deficiency of water or any other chemical that the human body makes. Examples are symptoms of thirst and physical symptoms of dehydration or water intoxication. These are NOT side effects of water.

Likewise, I believe that bioidentical hormones are among the safest pharmaceuticals that a physician can prescribe. Although I don’t believe that a patient may experience side effects from using bioidentical hormones such as estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone, I do believe that patients may experience symptoms of deficiency or excess of these hormones.

Although I don’t believe that bioidentical hormone therapy has side effects, I do want to emphasize that this type of treatment needs to prescribed carefully. Patients need to be monitored for symptoms of  hormone deficiency and hormone excess. Laboratory testing needs to be performed to ensure optimal results and patient safety.

The layperson may see no difference between drug side effects and the symptoms and signs of hormone deficiency or excess. However, to the experienced clinician the difference is usually quite evident and steps can be taken to optimize therapeutic balance and to protect the patient’s health and well-being.

Hormone Replacement Success – Rhythmic Dosing versus Low-Dose Static Dosing

Lori is a 51 year old patient who first came to my office in April 2007 for bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. She was interested in traditional low-dose, static hormone replacement therapy so I started her on a combination of progesterone cream, estradiol/estriol (“Bi-est”) cream, testosterone cream, and Armour thyroid.

After starting this therapy she felt better, but still had a hot flash when going to bed and she also felt a little hot throughout the night.

Her sleep was better, but she still woke up once in the middle of the night.

Memory was not as much of a problem but she still had some problem with recall.

In December 2007, I recommended that she switch to using rhythmic bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, following the Wiley Protocol. She started using estradiol and progesterone at dosage levels that follow the pattern that we see in healthy young women.

Within several months after starting the Wiley Protocol she noticed the following improvements:

  • Improved hair
  • Improvement of vaginal dryness
  • Improved skin (less dry).
  • Complete resolution of hot flashes and night sweats
  • Improved sleep
  • Less irritability
  • Improved quality of hair (less thin)

I recommended increasing the dosage of estradiol.

When I saw her for a routine follow up today the patient reported the following improvements:

  • Good libido
  • Improved memory
  • Improved thickness of hair with a return of the natural waviness
  • Improved skin

As compared to using low-dose, static testosterone replacement, she felt that the rhythmic testosterone replacement caused her libido to be more natural. With the low-dose, static dosing regimen her libido was at times too aggressive and she also had more unwanted hair on her legs.

The patient had also been using the Wiley Protocol Face Creme which contains insulin, estradiol, and triiodothyronine (T3) and which helps rejuvenate the skin and fade fine lines and wrinkles. This worked very well for her. I have some patients who reported that this Creme works a lot better than some very expensive skin care products that they had purchased previously.

I now have about 200 patients that have started rhythmic, bioidentical hormone replacement therapy following the Wiley Protocol. It has been a very rewarding experience for me to see many regain their sense of well being and in many cases even regain their lives after restoring their hormones to optimal levels.