Does Estrogen Have Side Effects?

This is a response that I posted to an online message board in response to somebody’s claim that “estrogen can have some awful side effects”.

Why would the human body make estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone) if they have side effects?

The link that […] provided refers to women who participated in the Women’s Health Initiative and who received PremPro.

It is very important understand that these women did not receive bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT). Instead they were POISONED with a combination of estrogens from horses (the Premarin component of the PremPro) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (the Provera component of the PremPro). None of these non-bioidentical chemicals are naturally found in the human body.

Needless to say that it is not surprising that these women had an increase of heart disease, breast cancer, blood clots, and stroke, causing this arm of the study to be aborted in 2002.

Unfortunately, many doctors and women still don’t understand this and continue to believe that these women suffered adverse reactions because of “hormone replacement therapy” or “HRT” even though these women did not receive any human hormones.

I have not seen any such adverse reactions in all my years of using properly balanced and monitored bioidentical hormone replacement therapy.

Estradiol, progesterone, and all the other hormones play an essential role in the human body, so I am not surprised that hormone replacement therapy could be helpful for women with a diagnosis of schizophrenia.

As a matter of fact, many mood disorders in women are related to hormonal disorders and I have seen marked improvements in women using BHRT.

Fred Bloem, MD

— In …@yahoogroups.com, […]> wrote:
>
> Estrogen can have some awful side effects :-
>
> http://www.estrogen-replacement-side-effects.com/html/effects.html
>
> On Mon, Jan 25, 2010 at 1:47 PM, <…> wrote:
> >
> > Estrogen in the Fight Against Schizophrenia
> >
> > ScienceDaily (Jan. 25, 2010) — Many American women are prescribed estrogen
> > to combat the negative effects of menopause, such as bone loss and mood
> > swings. Now, new evidence from a Tel Aviv University study suggests that
> > hormone replacement therapy might also protect them — and younger women —
> > from schizophrenia as well.
> >
> > Prof. Ina Weiner of Tel Aviv University’s Department of Psychology and her
> > doctoral student Michal Arad have reported findings suggesting that
> > restoring normal levels of estrogen may work as a protective agent in
> > menopausal women vulnerable to schizophrenia. Their work, based on an animal
> > model of menopausal psychosis, was recently reported in the journal *
> > Psychopharmacology.*
> >
> > *Continued at
> > http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100120112212.htm

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