Does Homeopathic HCG Work?

While I know a few people who have had success using homeopathic HCG drops, I don’t have enough experience in my practice to comment on its efficacy compared to real HCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin).

I can say that I have had patients come to my practice after having disappointing results with the homeopathic HCG. Patients typically have a greater than 80-90% success rate if they follow the HCG Diet Protocol correctly and follow up with me consistently.

Here are some things to consider with regard to homeopathic HCG:

  • “Homeopathic HCG” is believed to contain the energetic imprint of HCG but does not actually contain HCG. It is made with a minute amount of HCG that is diluted millions of times following homeopathic manufacturing practices.
  • There are many websites that claim to sell oral HCG (which I am able to legally offer to my patients in my medical practice, in addition to injectable HCG, HCG cream, nasal HCG, and HCG tablets) but instead provide homeopathic HCG.
  • One of the most commonly sold brands of homeopathic HCG contains 16% USP Alcohol which would be unacceptable for some people for religious or medical reasons.

I recommend that people find an experienced physician who will do a thorough medical evaluation before prescribing HCG. Although the HCG Diet Protocol is very safe, it does requires close monitoring to ensure optimal results. Another benefit of working with a physician (especially one who holistically oriented) is that other health issues will be recognized and treated as well.

HCG Diet for Skinny People? Does Size 00 Equal Anorexia?

After reading I am down from a size 4-6 to a size 00 a few people sent messages like these:

“This is not good news. A size 4-6 is very small..a double 00 is anorexic and shouldn’t be supported in a clinical environment. Boo”

“Size 00? Sounds TOO THIN to me!”

It is not possible to make an adequate assessment without having evaluated the patient like I have and taking into consideration a patient’s body build, size, and body composition.

In conventional circles patients are not considered medically overweight until their BMI (body mass index) is over 25. Likewise, a person is not considered medically obese until their BMI is over 30. The BMI is determined by dividing a person’s weight (in kilograms) by their height (in meters) squared (kg/m2).

I do not use this definition when I work with my patients. I consider patients obese if they have abnormal fat deposits regardless of their weight.

For example, the small framed patient in the referenced article presented to me 5 feet tall with a weight of 107.2 lbs. Accordingly, her BMI was 21 and she was not able to find any physicians willing to treat her even though she had clear evidence of abnormal fat deposits in the area of her buttocks and her thighs.

Most clinicians with little experience in the evaluation and treatment of obesity would not even consider treating her until she was “medically overweight” at 128 lbs (BMI 25) or “medically obese” at 154 lbs (BMI 30). Why should a patient have to wait so long to qualify for obesity treatment?

This patient had a very good response to the HCG Diet Protocol and quickly lost 17 lbs of abnormal and unwanted fat deposits. This returned her to her normal young adult weight of 90 lbs (BMI 17.6).

Clinical evaluation confirmed that she had maintained her muscle mass and structural fat and she did not look anorexic at all. One of the primary benefits of the HCG Diet Protocol is that it targets the abnormal fat deposits without causing muscle atrophy or disappearance of structural fat in the face and other areas of the body that is typical patients who are anorexic.

It has been my experience that once patients have eliminated the abnormal fat deposits by using the HCG Diet Protocol they will stop losing weight and muscle mass and normal, structural fat are maintained. I have not seen any patients who became anorexic or who developed an anorectic appearance while under my care.